​What you don’t know about the Doctor’s Strike

Truth is, negotiations over compensation arrangements always involve legitimate self-interest. The seller of services (in this case a doctor) attempts to obtain as much compensation as possible, while the buyer (Government) attempts to obtain the service at the lowest possible cost.
That is why there needs to be an updated nation’s estimated fair market value for every profession at any point in time. But before we get to that, here’s a major problem we have as Kenyans:
Simple Math
In the new demands, the proposed minimum basic salary is Ksh.107,730 up from the current Ksh.35,910. That’s a 200% INCREMENT not 300%. The 300% reflects the proposed pay as a percentage of the current pay NOT THE INCREMENT! Including allowances, the proposed minimum gross pay is Ksh.325,730 over the current Ksh.127,910. That’s a 154.65% INCREMENT and NOT 300% INCREMENT with 254.65% being the proposed gross pay as a percentage of the current gross pay.
Since we’ve cleared the air on the math, basing our arguments around the 154.65% Total Pay increment is utterly misleading. The argument should instead be centered on whether the basic salary the physicians are asking for reflects their fair market value. We need to take note of the fact that the 154.65% basically indicates the deviation of the current pay from what the physicians perceive to be the current fair market value of the profession.
So do the pay demands reflect the fair market value of a Physician in Kenya? This should be the basis of the discussion.
The Fair market value in this case is determined by several factors but I’d like to bring one obvious one into the spotlight: The Patient Demand. According to a recent article on The Star on a recent study by KMPDU, the survey revealed that Kenya has 3,956 doctors in the public sector but the number drops by the month as more doctors resign, having already lost over 2,000 of them as a result of poor working conditions. 3,956 doctors in public sector means Kenya is a nation with an estimated doctor: patient ratio of 1:17,000 against WHO recommended ratio of 1:1,000.
A ratio of 1:17000 mathematically means that each physician does the work of relatively 17 physicians ceteris paribus. That’s a mathematical projection of the current patient overload on an average physician in Kenya. Cuba, on the other hand, with 70,000 trained physicians, currently leads the world with the lowest doctor to patient ratio of 1:155 as per 2012; it’s probably at 1:140 or less by now. Clearly the lowest patient overload in the world~ Just in case you were about to bring Cuba Physician pay into the picture.
India on the other end has doctor to patient ratio of 1:1,681 as per 2016. South Africa: 1: 1,298 against a minimum gross pay of about Ksh. 370,000 per month. Do not forget that the average Consumer Price Index of South Africa over the past 3 years has been around 120.5 while Kenya’s at around 161.
So what does this data show us? Kenyan Physicians are overworked. And more importantly, the market value for a physician in Kenya is approximately over 10 Times higher than a physician in South Africa or USA for instance. Sad story.
Ok…enough with the pay and the suffering of these poor doctors.
Money is a sensitive issue. Definitely why the other more important demands in the CBA are easily going unnoticed: Review of physician working conditions, job structures and criteria for promotions and training, addressing under-staffing of medical professionals in public hospitals, availing of appropriate Medical Equipment, Medical Research facilitation among others.
The truth is, the realities of public hospitals in Kenya are horrible. With the implementation of this agreement as it is, we can project improved services in public hospitals especially for the average Kenyan. We don’t need any more of us struggling with finances to get folks to India or South Africa.
A study of the confederation of Indian Industry in 2005 put the annual number of Medical Tourists at 151,000 and projected the figure to rise by 15% a year. Current estimates put the numbers at around 500,000. About 60% of Kenyans who travel for medical care go to India, with South Africa coming at a distant second with slightly above 15%.
Studying these two countries, their major Health Industry Strengths are: Better doctor to patient ratio, Better working conditions, Better medical equipment and Medical Research facilitation. These, among others, generally translate to better services in public hospitals.
The same is possible for Kenya with this agreement’s implementation. Besides access to quality Health Services for an average Kenyan, Kenya can become a hub of medical tourism in the East Africa Region. According to Pathway CEO in a recent article on Nation, every month we get up to 2,000 patients coming to Kenya Hospitals from the greater East Africa region. We can triple this numbers every year.
But our government simply wants to trade all that with a 40% pay rise just to silence the doctor’s strike.
This is a government that allocates only Ksh. 60.4 Billion to Health, 2.43% of the 2016/2017 budget. The same government has lost over Ksh. 600 Billion to CORRUPTION, 24.2% of the 2016/2017 budget. It’s a shame.

Think about it. And don’t stop.

Something to Consider with Criticism

“It will lead to an opportunity for you to witness. Therefore make up your minds not to prepare your defense ahead of time, for I will give you such words and a wisdom that none of your adversaries will be able to resist or contradict.” Luke 21:13-15 (HCSB)

Criticism stinks. That’s usually my first thought when someone makes it clear they don’t like something I’ve done or said.

My pride says, “How dare you!”
My heart says, “I want a chance to explain.”
My soul says, “Jesus, am I off base?”
My mind says, “Why do I open myself up like this?”
My feelings say, “Ouch.”

Sometimes criticism is fair. Maybe I messed up and it would serve me well to reconsider. Other times criticism is nothing but rotten spew. And boy, does it stink. But if I get stuck in the stink, it serves no good purpose.

Might there be another way to look at harsh criticism? Is there a way to get past the hurt to see something about the one criticizing me that will soften my heart toward them?

Recently, I stumbled on an article about the armadillo lizard. This fascinating creature has hard and pointy scales that have “Don’t mess with me” written all over them. But, like all tough creatures, this lizard has a vulnerable place.

The armadillo lizard’s tough exterior wraps around its back but softens at the underbelly. When threatened, the lizard grabs its tail and displays a prickly, intimidating posture to keep other creatures away. At that point, the rest of the body serves only one purpose — to hide and protect its most vulnerable part.

So what does a strange desert creature have to do with criticism?

In an effort to protect my underbelly, I sometimes get all wrapped up in myself and tragically forget the underbelly of my critics — the place where they are vulnerable and might be hiding things, protected beneath their harsh words and a prickly exterior.

This is a place they may never let me see. It’s the storage place for their hurts and disappointments. It holds the root cause of their skepticism and the anger that probably has very little to do with me. “For the mouth speaks what the heart is full of” (Matthew 12:34b, NIV). And from the overflow of their hurt, they spewed.

Remember … behind every harsh critic is usually a broken-hearted person desperate for love.

If I forget the other person’s vulnerability, I am tempted to start storing up my own hurt, skepticism, anger and disappointments.

If I remember this underbelly, I have a much greater chance to keep it all in perspective. I can let my reaction be a good example to this other person just as our key verse, Luke 21:13-15 reminds us: “It will lead to an opportunity for you to witness. Therefore make up your minds not to prepare your defense ahead of time, for I will give you such words and a wisdom that none of your adversaries will be able to resist or contradict.”

When criticism comes — and it will — I must make up my mind not to worry about defending myself. I can resist the urge to become prickly and use it as an opportunity to be a witness. A witness of the love, grace and mercy of Jesus. Things I desperately need myself.

Dear Lord, thank You for this challenge to think about the other person’s underbelly before I react to criticism. I know it’s a simple step, but it’s so hard to live out. Help me put this truth into practice and to walk in the wisdom You have already given me. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

TRUTH FOR TODAY:
1 Peter 3:9, “Do not repay evil with evil or insult with insult. On the contrary, repay evil with blessing, because to this you were called so that you may inherit a blessing.” (NIV)

Proverbs 30:5, “Every word of God proves true. He is a shield to all who come to him for protection.” (NLT)

RELATED RESOURCES:
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Learn more about responding with honesty and kindness in the face of offense with Lysa TerKeurst’s book Unglued: Making Wise Choices in the Midst of Raw Emotions. You can purchase your copy here and start learning how to find peace even in your most difficult relationships.

REFLECT AND RESPOND:
Is there someone in your life who is consistently critical of you? Spend some time praying specifically for that person today. Ask God to show you how you can best be a witness to her, and ask Him to bring healing to her wounded and vulnerable places.

Sometimes we ourselves are the critical ones. Choose someone whom you would normally be critical of and focus on one way you can sincerely encourage her this week.

Beautiful things aren’t perfect

It seems strange to write this in a culture obsessed with perfection. But what is stranger perhaps, is that perfection is as much a construction as most other things; a dynamic idea that lives in the collective imagination of a people. Whether it’s bodies or art or rhetoric, or anything you can think of, we collectively negotiate and are in conversation essentially about a standard by which to determine things. And the height of this standard is perfect. But think of anything that you love, anything or anyone you think is beautiful – a painting, a book, a person – is it perfect? Are they perfect? Notwithstanding personal religious beliefs, my answer is always no.

Beauty itself has a standard, a standard that is wrought with biases and prejudice and cultural specifications and implications. Despite knowing that our understanding of beauty is limited not only because of our humanity, but because of the diverse ways in which we are socialized, we still have this yearning for reaching this standard of perfection in the things and the people we consider beautiful. Why do we do this to ourselves? Why do we do this to others? Why do we claim to want something futile and unattainable?

Perhaps if you believe as I do that there is a Creator and the Creator is perfect, and so our soul might have a predisposition to seek out perfection. But even within these theological constructs, it would be misguided to look for that perfection in ordinary beings, that I might encounter in a Supreme Being. After all, the world is fallen and if we take that for granted, then everything contains something good and beautiful. But also something tainted with the consequence of imperfection in a fallen world.

I often wonder how many people go to bed at night feeling so inadequate about who they are – from the features on their face, to the curves on their bodies; from head to spirit to soul to toe. I wonder about this because I find that all of us are so critical of ourselves, and not in way that is particularly beneficial. If you take perhaps half a day to listen to how you talk about yourself, you will realize that it’s incredibly suffocating much of the time. You are suffocating yourself in your expectations of perfection.

And of course these endless critiques are not limited to the person we see in the mirror. We transfer them to those around us, and we are often harsher than necessary. It makes sense. How can you be kind to others when you are not kind to yourself? We inflict upon each other these near impossible standards and expectations, and we are all founding wanting because of it. Ironically, it demonstrates further how we are creatures of imperfection.

Perhaps then it is in the brokenness of the things that make up our lives, that we ought to really search for beauty. Perhaps that is the only way to really find it, and to find often. Moreover, I am not sure a single perfect thing exists on this earth; I think that our constructions deceive us and limit us even more than we are already, in this state of being. I think it is better to still find beauty in the cruel, shameful, and ugly parts of life. I think that sort of beauty is resilient and mysterious and spectacular; and above all, honest. I think that sort of beauty lasts forever.

Beautiful things aren’t perfect.

The State Of Mfangano


Mfangano. Mfangano our mother land;strategically placed at the heart of the great lake Victoria.Endowed with priceless natural resources,blessed with the best brains that the world desperately needs,characterized by beautiful people,scenic landscape,wonderful wildlife and very pleasant Eco-system and environment. Mfangano is definitely heavenly;the universal throne of greatness.

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As someone quiped,”God,seating on His rotating seat,can be at ease sipping His cup of coffee while looking at man’s affairs all around Him-in all the islands;Remba,Ringiti,Migingo,Kiwa,Lolwe and dry land;Rusinga,Kaksingri.Gwasii and Labwe, that sorround Mfangano.
A great land of so great people that no one in the world can refute it is a fact.But truer is the fact that the mindset of most people in Mfangano is very prety. It is why they end up having mediocre lifestyle,below average.
There is nothing exciting about being average in life.Being average simply means being at the top of the bottom!Oh Mfangano,you are too endowed to beg,too blessed to be pretty. Don’t you know!

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Mfangano is great,her location royal,her potential first class ,her people strong but the only thing that is letting her down is the mindset of the majority whose philosophy in life,day by day perspectives and the thoughts patterns developed from childhood is very negative due to their rude and uninspired environment;these gallant sons and elegant daughters of this royal island suffer from some mental deficiency that develop in them,low self esteem;poor self image.With this,they end up training their eyes to look at life from a victim’s angle and consequently results to a life full of illusions,fantasies,self destructive attitudes and behaviors.
This is a tragedy of destiny.Their mindset and attitude is largely influenced and controlled by their negative life experiences.How unfortunate!Let’s be inspired before we expire.
Some of the sons and daughters of our mother land have turned their back on this island.Some have called it all sorts of names and abused it to some extent.Instead of looking forward to better days ahead and acting in a way that leads there,they have chosen to glance overseas in search of a great and dignified life.The exodus from Mfangano to the West(America) in recent years have been massive and prominent.I come from a village where almost every family’s dream is to have one or most of its members abroad.People have come to believe that to be great is to leave Mfangano,I thank God for those who didn’t believe in this and their presence in the island brought transformation to the community.

My advice to all of us is that you can blossom from whatever location you find yourself in this world.Maya Angelou said,’If you don’t like something change it,if you can’t change it,change your attitude’.Most people like petty lives,not because of their location but because of their attitude.

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It is very unfortunate how the majority of people in our island are trained mentally and socially from childhood to fear their dreams,doubt their destiny and disown their greatness.It’s like the core mission of our social set ups is to discourage us to believe beyond our community mental and social status.In most communities Dream killers and Destiny breakers have outnumbered positive minded people and this create a big negative imbalance in our upbringing,and as a result most youths are discouraged into believing into their own greatness and end settling for far less aspirations that are far below their real potential.

 

As Dr.Myles Munroe observed:’The result of this human ‘counter development’ process is that the majority of the hearth’s population lives under the spell and debilitating power of spectra called ‘fear’.Fear is the source of ninety percent of lack of progress and personal development in the lives of millions of gifted,talented,and resourceful individuals.

Many expert in the field of human behavior have stated that the fear of failure and fear of success are the most powerful and most prevalent fears experienced by human family.

Let’s be inspired and put on new glasses and start looking at life from a differing angle,let people’s opinions and most of the time their assessment of our,intelligence ,talents and ability not to led us to lower our own worth and treat our aspiration as suspect.Let’s back to drawing board and start a new and a fresh journey of greatness.

The kind of change that is needed is the kind that an entire island must undergo ,on behalf of their descendants ,and for their children’s children.It is the kind of change that is painful and terrifying and the stuff of true courage.It seems the Island forget to often,courage is more than a man(person) with a gun.

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The courage to be part of this change exists at the institutional level -where everything from education to poverty to employment to healthcare becomes tarnished with MFANGANO’s deep-seeted hatred and clanism.Changing this is a work of many generations.But there exist too a courage that is individual .It is a courage that begins with discomfort of having to confront and question all you’ve been told.

For many -for the majority of those who exist in power and privilege as far as identity goes it begins with the willingness to question the reality you live in;to admit that reality does not belong to everyone and standpoint is important.Because how can we even begin honest conversation about Island when we cannot agree that you and I leave in the same Island ,but because history and all that it brings ,that world is unequal and just?We do not experience the world in the same way as each other.

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And many cannot admit this ,many refuse to see that one’s perception of the world is not the only one that exists.And indeed that goes for everyone ,but especially those who exist in social positions of power.But if you want you want to find how well the society is in any subject,you asked the least privileged and least powerful-and it is there that you will find you mist important answers.

The truth is not always easy or simple .But the truth is an empty stomach ,a long ,hard day that become long hard months and years trying to make end meet;the truth is dead body in the ground.The truth is poverty ,prevails in Mfangano in 2016 in a way that is sometimes subtle and obvious.But it is always terrifying.

I find there is little courage when people are asked to admit these truths.Perhaps that is what is so frustrating about our conversation on this.We seem to disagree fundamentally on the fundamental-depending on who you are.Sometimes is a matter of mere education and other times,it is willful ignorance.

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You can’t force people to believe what you do.But you can provide sound social arguments,you can observe and explain social experiences of different groups-you can show patterns.But ultimately people must be left to their own devices to make up their own minds.The problem of course is that before we approach these conversations,many minds are already made up.The stories ,the realities cease to matter.It is unfortunate,I do think however ,that because these conversations are almost impossible that they should not be tried for.On the contrary ,I believe that trying to do the impossible is necessary
GOD BLESS YOU,GOD BLESS MFANGANO